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August 20, 2007
Matt Cooper Outs Rove On Meet The Press...And Nobody Cares?

So I'm so busy trying to not pay attention to Karl Rove on Meet The Press yesterday morning, that I don't bother to watch the rest of the show...

Where as, luck, or in this case, NBC, would have it, Matt Cooper apparently let the cat out o' the bag about Rove leaking Valerie Plame's identity. All casual and shit.

Then Gregory moves on to another topic...like nothing important was even said.

I wouldn't have even have known to go back and look at my recording if my trusty t r u t h o u t newsletter hadn't have informed me.




Gregory: Matt Cooper, let's pick up on an aspect of the interview with, with Karl Rove having to do with the leak case, the CIA leak case, that you were part of as well. And something that's very interesting, he, he went out of his way to say, "I would not have been a confirming source on this kind of information" and taking issue with, with Novak's testimony in his column that he knew who Valerie Plame was. He said he would never confirm that information. That's different from your experience with him.

Cooper: Yeah, I, I think he was dissembling, to put it charitably. Look, Karl Rove told me about Valerie Plame's identity on July 11th, 2003. I called him because Ambassador Wilson was in the news that week. I didn't know Ambassador Wilson even had a wife until I talked to Karl Rove and he said that she worked at the agency and she worked on WMD. I mean, to imply that he didn't know about it or that this was all a leak by someone else...

Gregory: Or that he had heard it from somebody else...

Cooper: or that he heard it as some rumor out in the hallway is, is nonsense.

Gregory: But he makes no apologies to Valerie Plame.

Cooper: Karl Rove never apologizes. That's not what he does.

Then Gregory just changes the subject..."Back to politics..."

I thought they were talking about politics...

Posted by Lisa at 08:34 PM
March 06, 2007
Libby Found Guilty

Ah. That feels better. But just a little, because it would seem that Dick and Karl got off without a scratch. Damn!

Sure didn't take too long for the Jury to find Libby guilty of perjury and obstruction of justice.

Libby Found Guilty in CIA Leak Trial
By MICHAEL J. SNIFFEN and MATT APUZZO
Associated Press Writers

via t r u t h o u t

Vice President Dick Cheney's former chief of staff, I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby, was convicted Tuesday of lying and obstructing an investigation into the leak of a CIA operative's identity.

Libby is the highest-ranking White House official to be convicted of a felony since the Iran-Contra scandal of the mid-1980s. The conviction focused renewed attention on the Bush administration's much-criticized handling of weapons of mass destruction intelligence in the run-up to the Iraq war.

The verdict culminated a nearly four-year investigation into how CIA official Valerie Plame's name was leaked to reporters in 2003. The trial revealed how top members of the Bush administration were eager to discredit Plame's husband, former Ambassador Joseph Wilson, who accused the administration of doctoring prewar intelligence on Iraq...

He faces up to 30 years in prison when he is sentenced June 5 but under federal sentencing guidelines is likely to face far less. Defense attorneys immediately promised to ask for a new trial or appeal the conviction...

Reaction to the conviction on Capitol Hill was swift. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid welcomed the jury's verdict and called on Bush to pledge not to pardon Libby. Before the trial began, the Justice Department said it had no pardon file active for Libby.

"It's about time someone in the Bush Administration has been held accountable for the campaign to manipulate intelligence and discredit war critics," Reid said...

U.S. District Judge Reggie B. Walton ordered a pre-sentencing report be completed by May 15. Judges use such reports to help determine sentences. Libby will be allowed to remain free while awaiting sentencing.

http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/C/CIA_LEAK_TRIAL?SITE=NYSTA&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT&CTIME=2007-03-06-13-11-06

Here is the full text of the entire article in case the link goes bad:

Libby Found Guilty in CIA Leak Trial

By MICHAEL J. SNIFFEN and MATT APUZZO
Associated Press Writers

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Vice President Dick Cheney's former chief of staff, I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby, was convicted Tuesday of lying and obstructing an investigation into the leak of a CIA operative's identity.

Libby is the highest-ranking White House official to be convicted of a felony since the Iran-Contra scandal of the mid-1980s. The conviction focused renewed attention on the Bush administration's much-criticized handling of weapons of mass destruction intelligence in the run-up to the Iraq war.

The verdict culminated a nearly four-year investigation into how CIA official Valerie Plame's name was leaked to reporters in 2003. The trial revealed how top members of the Bush administration were eager to discredit Plame's husband, former Ambassador Joseph Wilson, who accused the administration of doctoring prewar intelligence on Iraq.

Libby, who was once Cheney's most trusted adviser and an assistant to Bush, was expressionless as the jury verdict was announced on the 10th day of deliberations. His wife choked out a sob and sank her head.

He faces up to 30 years in prison when he is sentenced June 5 but under federal sentencing guidelines is likely to face far less. Defense attorneys immediately promised to ask for a new trial or appeal the conviction.

"We have every confidence Mr. Libby ultimately will be vindicated," defense attorney Theodore Wells told a throng of reporters. "We believe Mr. Libby is totally innocent and that he didn't do anything wrong."

Libby did not speak to reporters.

Special Prosecutor Patrick Fitzgerald, who has led the leak investigation, said no additional charges would be filed. That means nobody will be charged with the leak and Libby, who was not the source for the original column outing Plame, will be the only one to face trial.

"The results are actually sad," Fitzgerald said. "It's sad that we had a situation where a high-level official person who worked in the office of the vice president obstructed justice and lied under oath. We wish that it had not happened, but it did."

White House deputy press secretary Dana Perino said Bush watched news of the verdict on TV in the Oval Office. Perino said the president respected the jury's verdict but "was saddened for Scooter Libby and his family."

Perino said "I would not agree" with any characterization of the verdict as embarrassing for the White House.

"I think that any administration that has to go through a prolonged news story that is unpleasant and one that is difficult - when you're under the constraints and the policy of not commenting on an ongoing criminal matter - that can be very frustrating," she said.

Libby was convicted of one count of obstruction, two counts of perjury and one count of lying to the FBI about how he learned Plame's identity and whom he told. Prosecutors said he learned about Plame from Cheney and others, discussed her name with reporters and, fearing prosecution, made up a story to make those discussions seem innocuous.

Libby said he told investigators his honest recollections and blamed any misstatements on a faulty memory. He was acquitted of one count of lying to the FBI about his conversation with Time magazine reporter Matthew Cooper.

One juror who spoke to reporters outside court said the jury had 34 poster-size pages filled with information they distilled from the trial testimony. They discerned that Libby was told about Plame at least nine times and they didn't buy the argument that he forgot all about it.

"Even if he forgot that someone told him about Mrs. Wilson, who had told him, it seemed very unlikely he would not have remembered about Mrs. Wilson," the juror, Denis Collins, said.

Collins, a former Washington Post reporter, said jurors wanted to hear from others involved in the case, including Bush political adviser Karl Rove, who was one of two sources for the original leak. Defense attorneys originally said both Libby and Cheney would be witnesses and Rove was on the potential witness list.

"I will say there was a tremendous amount of sympathy for Mr. Libby on the jury. It was said a number of times, 'What are we doing with this guy here? Where's Rove? Where are these other guys?' " Collins said. "I'm not saying we didn't think Mr. Libby was guilty of the things we found him guilty of. It seemed like he was, as Mr. Wells put it, he was the fall guy."

Reaction to the conviction on Capitol Hill was swift. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid welcomed the jury's verdict and called on Bush to pledge not to pardon Libby. Before the trial began, the Justice Department said it had no pardon file active for Libby.

"It's about time someone in the Bush Administration has been held accountable for the campaign to manipulate intelligence and discredit war critics," Reid said.

Perino would not discuss Reid's pardon concerns.

Wilson and Plame have sued Libby, Cheney and several other administration officials in federal court. Attorneys at the liberal watchdog group Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics, which brought the lawsuit, praised the conviction and Fitzgerald's team.

"Their prosecution of a senior White House official illustrates that we are a nation of laws and that no man is above the law," attorneys said in a prepared statement.

U.S. District Judge Reggie B. Walton ordered a pre-sentencing report be completed by May 15. Judges use such reports to help determine sentences. Libby will be allowed to remain free while awaiting sentencing.

Posted by Lisa at 10:37 AM
April 14, 2006
Scooter Names Karl Rove and Ari Fleischer In Plame Scandal

This is from the April 13, 2006 program.

Libby's latest court filings name Karl Rove and Ari Fleischer as people who were also involved in leaking the information about Valerie Plame to the press. In Ari Fleischer's grand jury testimony, he describes a day when Scooter Libby took him to lunch, which had never happened before, and Scooter told him that Joseph Wilson's wife was a CIA agent, and that it was not widely known. (wink wink) Ari said that he took that to mean that he should leak it to the press. But the important part here is, of course, that Scooter has named Karl Rove as being involved in the conspiracy.




Video - Rove Implicated by Libby
(Quicktime 17 MB)

Audio - Rove Implicated by Libby
(MP3 9 MB)

Posted by Lisa at 03:04 PM
Joseph Wilson On Keith Olbermann

This is from the April 10, 2006 program of
Countdown with Keith Olbermann
.

As always, Keith Olbermann is the only guy in the news media thoroughly covering this story.

Joseph Wilson clarifies the details and emphasizes seriousness of the situation.

In a nutshell, President Bush, Cheney and Karl Rove are traitors. Together, they conspired to out Valerie Plame as a CIA agent in retaliation for her husband's going to the media about how Saddam hadn't really purchased uranium from Niger, and therefore, how Iraq's WMDs didn't exist.


Video - Joe Wilson on Olbermann - All
(37 MB)

Video - Joe Wilson on Olbermann - Intro
(9 MB)

Video - Joe Wilson on Olbermann - Wilson Interview
(13 MB)

Video - Joe Wilson on Olbermann - Shuster Analysis
(10 MB)


Audio - Joe Wilson on Olbermann - All
(18 MB)

Audio - Joe Wilson on Olbermann - Intro
(5 MB)

Audio - Joe Wilson on Olbermann - Wilson Interview
(9 MB)

Audio - Joe Wilson on Olbermann - Shuster Analysis
(6 MB)

Posted by Lisa at 02:33 PM
April 13, 2006
Joseph Wilson On 60 Minutes - How Valerie Plame Leak Threatens Our National Security

This is from the October 30, 2005 program of 60 minutes


I've been clearing off my TIVO since I've been home so much lately, and what do I run across but a 60 Minutes piece from October 30, 2005 about Valerie Plame. Not about the scandal per se, but about Valerie: who she was, what she did, and the lives potentially at risk and irrepairable damage that has been done to our National Security as a result of her identity being revealed.


Valerie was an undercover Agent gathering intelligence about numerous countries' Nuclear Weapons programs. She dedicated her life to protecting the National Security of the United States. She recommended her husband, Joseph Wilson, to go on another patriotic mission to Nigeria to verify whether or not Saddam Hussein had purchased uranium from there. Wilson went on this mission, almost as a favor, for the Vice President himself. When Wilson came back with the truth - that the documents saying Saddam had purchased uranium were forged, the Vice President wanted Wilson to keep quiet about it.

When he did not, and instead offered up to the press what he had uncovered, our Bush, Cheney and Rove conspired to reveal his wife's identity in retaliation.

Wow. You've really got to see this for yourself.


Video - 60 Minutes On The CIA Leak - All


Video - 60 Minutes On The CIA Leak - Part One


Video - 60 Minutes On The CIA Leak - Part Two


Audio - 60 Minutes On The CIA Leak - All


Audio - 60 Minutes On The CIA Leak - Part One


Audio - 60 Minutes On The CIA Leak - Part Two

Posted by Lisa at 05:38 PM
February 10, 2006
MP3s Now Available Of Meet The Press Interviews Of Rove and Rummy

I've been shaping up my library a bit. Going through old hard drives and making sure that I have uploaded things before I clear off my drive.

What I'm actually finding is a file or two I forgot to upload, or sets of video files I forgot to generate MP3s for. So...

That's what I did today: generated MP3s of Rove and Rummy on Meet The Press:

Rummy on Meet The Press - February 6, 2005

Rummy MP3s
(MP3s)

Rummy Videos
(Videos)


Rove on Meet the Press - November 7, 2004

Rove MP3s


Rove Videos

Posted by Lisa at 08:46 PM
February 04, 2006
What A Set Up - Libby's Trial Set For January 2007

Scooter Libby's trial has been conveniently calendered for AFTER the upcoming election.


Libby Trial Date Set for January 2007

By Edwin Chen for the The Los Angeles Times


A US District Court judge today set a January, 2007 trial date for I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby, a former top White House official who was indicted on five counts of perjury, obstruction of justice and lying to the FBI in a federal investigation on how a CIA operative's identity was exposed.

Libby, who was Vice President Dick Cheney's chief of staff and his top national security adviser, has proclaimed his innocence.

"We are very happy with the trial date," Theodore Wells, Libby's lawyer, said after today's court hearing. "The Jan. 8 date will permit us the time we need to prepare our defense," he said, adding his client was "totally innocent."

Special prosecutor Patrick J. Fitzgerald launched the investigation after the CIA operative, Valerie Plame, was identified in the news media in 2003. At the time, her husband, Joseph C. Wilson IV, a former ambassador, had emerged as a prominent critic of the manner in which the Bush Administration had used intelligence to build a case to launch the Iraq war.

Here is the full text of the article in case the link goes bad:

http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-020306libby_lat,0,1476603.story

Also available at truthout:

http://www.truthout.org/docs_2006/020306R.shtml

Libby Trial Date Set for January 2007
By Edwin Chen
The Los Angeles Times

Friday 03 February 2006

Washington - A US District Court judge today set a January, 2007 trial date for I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby, a former top White House official who was indicted on five counts of perjury, obstruction of justice and lying to the FBI in a federal investigation on how a CIA operative's identity was exposed.

Libby, who was Vice President Dick Cheney's chief of staff and his top national security adviser, has proclaimed his innocence.

"We are very happy with the trial date," Theodore Wells, Libby's lawyer, said after today's court hearing. "The Jan. 8 date will permit us the time we need to prepare our defense," he said, adding his client was "totally innocent."

Special prosecutor Patrick J. Fitzgerald launched the investigation after the CIA operative, Valerie Plame, was identified in the news media in 2003. At the time, her husband, Joseph C. Wilson IV, a former ambassador, had emerged as a prominent critic of the manner in which the Bush Administration had used intelligence to build a case to launch the Iraq war.

Libby, who resigned after being indicted in late October, attended today's hearing, which lasted about 45 minutes, but said little.

The judge, Reggie Walton, said he expected jury selection to take a few days. And lawyers for both sides said they expected the trial to last about a month.

Still at issue is whether Fitzgerald has turned over all the relevant documents being sought by the defense. The prosecutor said the process was "99% complete," including the delivery of 1,250 pages to the defense team this week. But Wells said he believed that Fitzgerald still had "thousands and thousands and thousands of pages" in documents that should be turned over.

Posted by Lisa at 02:00 PM
October 25, 2005
The Waters Rise Around Rove and Libby

This is from October 21, 2005.

Patrick Fitzgerald has a nice website containing documents about the case now, too!

Cover-Up Issue Is Seen as Focus in Leak Inquiry

By David Johnston for the NY Times.


WASHINGTON, Oct. 20 - As he weighs whether to bring criminal charges in the C.I.A. leak case, Patrick J. Fitzgerald, the special counsel, is focusing on whether Karl Rove, the senior White House adviser, and I. Lewis Libby Jr., chief of staff for Vice President Dick Cheney, sought to conceal their actions and mislead prosecutors, lawyers involved in the case said Thursday.

Among the charges that Mr. Fitzgerald is considering are perjury, obstruction of justice and false statement - counts that suggest the prosecutor may believe the evidence presented in a 22-month grand jury inquiry shows that the two White House aides sought to cover up their actions, the lawyers said.

Mr. Rove and Mr. Libby have been advised that they may be in serious legal jeopardy, the lawyers said, but only this week has Mr. Fitzgerald begun to narrow the possible charges. The prosecutor has said he will not make up his mind about any charges until next week, government officials say.

With the term of the grand jury expiring in one week, though, some lawyers in the case said they were persuaded that Mr. Fitzgerald had all but made up his mind to seek indictments. None of the lawyers would speak on the record, citing the prosecutor's requests not to talk about the case...

Mr. Wilson had become an irritant to the administration in the late spring and early summer of 2003 even before he went public as a critic of the war in Iraq by writing a July 6, 2003 Op-Ed article in The New York Times.

In that article he wrote that he had traveled to Africa in 2002 to explore the accuracy of intelligence reports that suggested Iraq might have tried to purchase uranium ore from Niger. Mr. Wilson said that he had been sent on the trip by the C.I.A. after Mr. Cheney's office raised questions about one such report, but that he found it unlikely that any sale had taken place...

Mr. Rove did not tell the grand jury about his phone conversation with Mr. Cooper until months into the leak investigation, long after he had testified about his conversation with Mr. Novak, the lawyers said. Later, Mr. Rove said he had not recalled the conversation with Mr. Cooper until the discovery of an e-mail message about it that he sent to Stephen J. Hadley, then the deputy national security adviser. But Mr. Fitzgerald has remained skeptical about the omission, the lawyers said.

In Mr. Libby's case, Mr. Fitzgerald has focused on his statements about how he first learned of Ms. Wilson's identity, the lawyers said. Mr. Libby has said that he learned of Ms. Wilson from reporters. But Mr. Fitzgerald may have doubts about his account because the journalists who have been publicly identified as having talked to Mr. Libby have said that they did not provide the name, that they could not recall what had been said or that they had discussed unrelated subjects.

Here is the full text of the article in case the link goes bad:

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/10/21/politics/21leak.html?ei=5094&en=e9e43780001cbcef&hp=&ex=1129953600&adxnnl=1&partner=homepage&adxnnlx=1130191562-XfK2v+tnLb3O3SW/nZgFqw

Cover-Up Issue Is Seen as Focus in Leak Inquiry

By DAVID JOHNSTON
Published: October 21, 2005

WASHINGTON, Oct. 20 - As he weighs whether to bring criminal charges in the C.I.A. leak case, Patrick J. Fitzgerald, the special counsel, is focusing on whether Karl Rove, the senior White House adviser, and I. Lewis Libby Jr., chief of staff for Vice President Dick Cheney, sought to conceal their actions and mislead prosecutors, lawyers involved in the case said Thursday.

Among the charges that Mr. Fitzgerald is considering are perjury, obstruction of justice and false statement - counts that suggest the prosecutor may believe the evidence presented in a 22-month grand jury inquiry shows that the two White House aides sought to cover up their actions, the lawyers said.
Skip to next paragraph
Doug Mills/The New York Times

Karl Rove, senior adviser to President Bush, leaving the courthouse in Washington on Oct. 14. At left is Mr. Rove's lawyer, Robert D. Luskin.
Shawn Thew/Agence France-Presse Getty Images

I. Lewis Libby, Vice President Dick Cheney's chief of staff, testifying before a House committee in 2001.

Mr. Rove and Mr. Libby have been advised that they may be in serious legal jeopardy, the lawyers said, but only this week has Mr. Fitzgerald begun to narrow the possible charges. The prosecutor has said he will not make up his mind about any charges until next week, government officials say.

With the term of the grand jury expiring in one week, though, some lawyers in the case said they were persuaded that Mr. Fitzgerald had all but made up his mind to seek indictments. None of the lawyers would speak on the record, citing the prosecutor's requests not to talk about the case.

Associates of Mr. Rove and Mr. Libby continued to express hope that the prosecutor would conclude that the evidence was too fragmentary and that it would be difficult to prove Mr. Rove or Mr. Libby had a clear-cut intention to misinform the grand jury. Lawyers for the two men declined to comment on their legal status.

The case has cast a cloud over the White House, as has the Congressional criticism over the Supreme Court nomination of Harriet E. Miers. On Thursday, responding to a reporter's question, Mr. Bush said: "There's some background noise here, a lot of chatter, a lot of speculation and opining. But the American people expect me to do my job, and I'm going to."

The possible violations under consideration by Mr. Fitzgerald are peripheral to the issue he was appointed in December 2003 to investigate: whether anyone in the administration broke a federal law that makes it a crime, under certain circumstances, to reveal the identity of a covert intelligence officer.

But Mr. Rove and Mr. Libby may not be the only people at risk. There may be others in the government who could be charged for violations of the disclosure law or of other statutes, like the espionage act, which makes it a crime to transmit classified information to people not authorized to receive it.

It is still not publicly known who first told the columnist Robert D. Novak the identity of the C.I.A. officer, Valerie Wilson. Mr. Novak identified her in a column on July 14, 2003, using her maiden name, Valerie Plame. Mr. Fitzgerald knows the identity of this source, a person who is not believed to work at the White House, the lawyers said.

The accounts given by Mr. Rove and Mr. Libby about their conversations with reporters have been under investigation almost from the start. According to lawyers in the case, the prosecutor has examined how each man learned of Ms. Wilson, and questioned them in grand jury appearances about their conversations with reporters, how they learned Ms. Wilson's name and her C.I.A. employment and whether the discussions were part of an effort to undermine the credibility of her husband, a former ambassador, Joseph C. Wilson IV.

Mr. Wilson had become an irritant to the administration in the late spring and early summer of 2003 even before he went public as a critic of the war in Iraq by writing a July 6, 2003 Op-Ed article in The New York Times.

In that article he wrote that he had traveled to Africa in 2002 to explore the accuracy of intelligence reports that suggested Iraq might have tried to purchase uranium ore from Niger. Mr. Wilson said that he had been sent on the trip by the C.I.A. after Mr. Cheney's office raised questions about one such report, but that he found it unlikely that any sale had taken place.

In Mr. Rove's case, the prosecutor appears to have focused on two conversations with reporters. The first was a July 9, 2003, discussion with Mr. Novak in which, Mr. Rove has said, he first heard Ms. Wilson's name. The second conversation took place on July 11, 2003 with a Time magazine reporter, Matthew Cooper, who later wrote that Mr. Rove had not named Ms. Wilson but had told him that she worked at the C.I.A. and that she had been responsible for her husband being sent to Africa.

Mr. Rove did not tell the grand jury about his phone conversation with Mr. Cooper until months into the leak investigation, long after he had testified about his conversation with Mr. Novak, the lawyers said. Later, Mr. Rove said he had not recalled the conversation with Mr. Cooper until the discovery of an e-mail message about it that he sent to Stephen J. Hadley, then the deputy national security adviser. But Mr. Fitzgerald has remained skeptical about the omission, the lawyers said.

In Mr. Libby's case, Mr. Fitzgerald has focused on his statements about how he first learned of Ms. Wilson's identity, the lawyers said. Mr. Libby has said that he learned of Ms. Wilson from reporters. But Mr. Fitzgerald may have doubts about his account because the journalists who have been publicly identified as having talked to Mr. Libby have said that they did not provide the name, that they could not recall what had been said or that they had discussed unrelated subjects.

Posted by Lisa at 02:32 PM
September 22, 2005
New Animation From Mark Fiore: Kan Do Karl

Like much of this country's current events, the New Orleans Catastrophe is playing out like a bad TV movie.

Halliburton, Kellog and Root etc. are actually going to benefit from this disaster. They win. Everybody else loses. The end.

Kan Do Karl

Posted by Lisa at 11:47 AM
November 11, 2004
Karl Rove On Meet The Press

This is from the November 7, 2004 program.

Karl Rove On Meet The Press (Parts 1-3)
(19 MB, 18 MB, 9 MB)

Posted by Lisa at 01:50 PM